Resource Management in Emergency Planning + Response

Managers should consider what resources they have at their disposal to effectively manage their emergency response.

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Managing personnel, specialized teams, equipment, and supplies are an intricate part of response planning and incident management, yet these critical details are often overlooked. Resource management procedures should be included as an element of a response plan and have the flexibility and depth to address uncertainties associated with responses.

Effectively incorporating company, contracted, and public resources into an emergency management program can streamline a multifaceted response, resulting in a more effective and timely effort. If managed properly, available resources can also reduce potential business continuity vulnerabilities.

According to NIMS' Resource Management Planning, resources typically fall into seven general groupings:

  • Personnel: Includes emergency operations center staff and onsite responders
  • Facilities: Includes emergency operations center, field command posts, and staging areas
  • Equipment: Includes equipment required for PPE, personnel support, communications, response operations, and emergency operations center support
  • Vehicles: Includes automobiles, trucks, buses, and other vehicles required for transportation, emergency medical, and response operations
  • Teams: Includes specially trained and equipped responders and management personnel
  • Aircraft: Includes aircraft for surveillance, medical evacuation, or cargo transportation operations
  • Supplies: Includes a wide range of materials from potable water to plywood

NIMS recommends the following resource management practices be incorporated into an response plan for implementation during future response operations:

1. Identify: Identify what equipment is needed, where and when it is needed, and who will be receiving or using it. Some resources will be specific to one risk or consequence, while others may be useful for multiple risks or consequences.

2. Procure: Take into account lead-time required for resources that cannot be obtained locally.

3. Mobilize: Plan transportation and logistics needs based on response priorities and equipment requirements to ensure timely arrival of necessary equipment.

4. Track and report: Identify specific location of resources on a continual basis in order to assist staff in preparing to receive resources, to ensure safety and security of equipment and to ensure efficient use, coordination, and movement of equipment.

5. Recover and demobilize: Ensure timely demobilization of equipment, including decontamination, disposal, repair, and restocking activities, as required. This step pertains to both expendable and nonexpendable resources.

6. Reimburse: Ensure that a mechanism is in place to track costs and provide timely payment for incident expenses, including contractors, equipment, transportation services, and other costs. .

7. Inventory and Replenish: Utilize a resource inventory system or equipment checklist to assess the availability of on-site equipment and supplies. Procure additional resources as needed to be prepared for future events. Consider lessons learned from previous responses to assess on-site requirements.

Through concepts listed TRP's free downloaded corporate hurricane checklist, companies can begin to understand the resources necessary to respond to a significant weather event.

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